Website Updated: 04/20/2018
We ship within the U.S. only (if needed)
Phone: 512-956-0937
Email: jcaviary@gmail.com

JC Aviary 

Austin, TX

  • Deposit/Payments FAQs

  • How can a customer put a deposit on a bird? 
  • You can use PayPal to instantly reserve your baby. Please email or call us when you're ready to put down a deposit on a bird. We're quick at responding. To put down a deposit, we'll need the email address associated with your PayPal account to send you an invoice. Once a customer accepts an invoice sent by JC Aviary on your PayPal, the baby you want will be reserved. If you don't have a PayPal account, please call or email us and we can work on a different payment option. All deposits are non-refundable. 

  • Does my deposit count towards my total amount due? 
Yes, your deposit counts towards your total.

  • How much deposit do we require? 
  • We require a deposit of ($200-$500) depending on the type of bird. Description of a bird your interested in will indicate how much deposit is required for the specific bird.

  • What forms of payments do we accept?
  • We accept cash, PayPal, checks, money orders or direct deposit. Please click on our "Terms and Conditions" tab to read more detailed information on payments.

  • When is the full amount due after the deposit? 
  • The remaining balance will be due two weeks before pickup or shipping date. For local pick ups, please bring cash and you can pick up your bird the same day. If your baby bird is being shipped to you, please pay the full amount due two weeks in advance before your baby leaves our aviary. 

  • Do we offer any payment plan? 
  • Yes, payment Plan via PayPal credit only: https://www.paypal.com/us/webapps/mpp/paypal-credit

  • Shipping FAQs

  • How does shipping work? 
  • We take care of all the flight/shipping arrangements. All a customer has to do is to pickup their baby at their nearest airport with a Valid I.D. Simple and Safe! 

    We'll coordinate flight times with our customer a few days in advance before the bird is being shipped (weather permitting). We'll drop off the bird at our airport and the customer will pick up the bird at their nearest major airport.  Customers is supplied with the airline, flight number(s), air waybill number, and flight arrival time prior to departure. A direct flight will arrive within 3-6 hours depending on your state. Please click on our "Terms and Conditions" tab to read more detailed information on shipping.

  • Is shipping safe for the birds?
  • Our shipping method is very safe for the birds. Our pet carriers are well designed to ensure our bird(s) enjoy their flight to their destination. We provide food, water and soft bedding inside the shipping carriers to make sure the baby is comfortable while traveling. In addition, we train our bird(s) to be in a pet carrier daily for a few mins to ensure they don't get scared while traveling during their flight. 

  • What is inside/on top of the shipping carrier?
    A weaned bird comes with extra food (Pellets/Seeds mix) inside a ziplock lock bag that will last you a few days.
    Un-weaned bird comes with a hand-feeding syringe, pellets/seeds that the baby is being weaned on and baby formula that will last you a few days.

    Manila folder with an Avian vet health certificate, disease testing lab report, bird care (Tips and Advice), favorites fruits/veggies list and hatch certificate is attached on top of every shipping carrier. 

  • Does the price of a bird on our website include shipping or DNA? 
  • No, the prices on our website does not included shipping or DNA. Please click on our "Terms and Conditions" tab to read more detailed information on shipping or DNA. 

  • How much is the shipping cost?
  • Our shipping ranges between $150-$250 depending on the type of bird and your state. 

  • Do we guarantee our shipping?
  • Yes, all our birds are guaranteed to arrive at your airport safely. However, immediate inspection is necessary to insure any damage didn't occur during shipping and the birds are alive at delivery. We have a 24 hour limit of notification, after deliver of the birds, of any death at the point of delivery, specified on the order. (Don't worry, this has never happened to us). 

  • Do birds come with a health guarantee?
  • Yes, all our weaned birds come with a full health guarantee. We provide our customers with a 72hrs health guarantee to take the bird(s) to an avian veterinarian. If an avian veterinarian states that the bird was Unfit for sale (not healthy), a certificate/paperwork must be presented to JC aviary within 24 hours of exam for exchange or full refund of the bird(s). Please click on our "Health Guarantee" tab to read more detailed information.

All our birds (weaned or un-weaned) are DISEASE TESTED negative for Polyomavirus (PVD), Avian Borna virus (ABV), Proventricular Dilatation Disease (PDD), Psittacine Beak and Feather Disease (PBFD), and Chlamydia psittaci. We provide paperwork with every bird we sell. 

  • Bringing your new bird home.... (Settling in)

When you get home, put your bird in the cage and let him/her be. He/She needs time to adjust to his/her surroundings. No matter how cute he/she is, how much you want to show him/her off, or how much the kids want to have him/her perch on their fingers, let your bird be.

Give him/her a day of peace to adjust. Offer him/her water, fruits/veggies along with pellets/seed mix as soon you get home. 

Moustaki, N. (2005). Parrots for dummies. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Pub.

  • Local Texas Visitors FAQs

  • How can I set-up an appointment? 
Our store is open by appointment only. Please email us to set-up an appointment. Same day appointments are mostly not available so please give us a 24hr notice before you would like to stop by.

  • What do I need to bring on the day of pickup? 
Cash only. We will provide you with a travel carrier and anything else necessary to make sure your baby bird gets home safe and sound. 

  • Can I come visit my bird that I left a deposit on? 
Yes, we allow you to come visit your bird after its fully feathered. Please make sure to set an appointment in advance.  

  • How long are the appointments? 
Appointments are only 25 minutes long. We will be prepared with your paperwork and ready to answer all of your questions. If you're more than 15 mins late, you will have to reschedule your appointment for another day. 

  • Where do I go to visit or pickup our bird? 
Once you setup an appointment with us, we will give you our address to stop by our store. We do not allow visits without appointments. 

  • What paperwork is provided with my bird?
We provide our customers with a manila folder that has an avian veterinarian health certificate, disease testing lab report, bird care (Tips and Advice), favorites fruits/veggies list and a hatch certificate.

  • Do we sell bird food, treats, bird play stands and cages? 
Yes, we have all the food bags, treats, tree stands, toys and cages in stock at all times. You can purchase those from us on the day of pickup. 

  • Do we allow visitors to tour our aviary?
We do not allow visitors to tour our aviary. This is for security against theft and isolation of our flock to control disease and infection from other birds and animals keepers. You can setup an appointment with us to visit the baby bird(s) of your choice at our store. Our store is open by appointment only.

  • Bringing your new bird home.... (Settling in)

When you get home, put your bird in the cage and let him/her be. He/She needs time to adjust to his/her surroundings. No matter how cute he/she is, how much you want to show him/her off, or how much the kids want to have him/her perch on their fingers, let your bird be.

Give him/her a day of peace to adjust. Offer him/her water, fruits/veggies along with pellets/seed mix as soon you get home. 

* Moustaki, N. (2005). Parrots for dummies. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Pub.

DNA/Sexing FAQs

  • How do I know the gender of my bird?
  • On most birds, only blood testing can say for certain whether your bird is a male or female. DNA blood testing is an additional $40 and we can have that done on your bird upon request. 

    Bird Boarding FAQs

  • Do we take birds in for boarding?
  • Sorry, we do not take in any bird(s) for boarding. We appreciate you trusting us with your baby. However, we have to protect our flock/babies from bird disease/infection from other birds and animal keepers. Therefore, we do not allow any birds to come in our aviary. Your local pet shops or bird hospitals may have some boarding options.

    Other FAQs

    • Bathing Your Parrot - Simple and Safely!
    Most parrots love to bathe, which softens dirt on the feathers and skin and encourages preening. If you bathe your parrot regularly, you will notice that his feathers will begin to become waterproof due to his preening duties. Bathing is important for parrots, whose skin can become dry and itchy, leading to plucking. It’s also important that any pollutants be removed from the bird’s feathers so that it doesn’t ingest any toxic stuff while preening.

    Here are some bathing tips:
    • In warm weather, or when you can provide enough warmth after a bath, you can mist your parrot with a handheld spray bottle.
    • Try misting above the bird so that the water simulates a rain shower. 
    • In the summer, you can completely soak your parrot to the skin a couple of times a week. This is very good for your bird.
    • In very cool weather, keep bathing to a minimum unless you can offer heat after the bath. A bird lamp will do.
    • Bathe only in the daytime hours — a bird that goes to bed wet can catch a chill and will be uncomfortable.
    • Don’t blow-dry your parrot. Some blow-dryers contain nonstick coating on the heating coils, which can be deadly to your bird.

    Moustaki, N. (2005). Parrots for dummies. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Pub.

    • Potty Training Your Bird

    With patience and consistency, you can teach your bird to relieve himself/herself on command, in a place of your choosing. Young birds seem to pick up the skill most quickly and reliably, but you can teach an older bird new tricks, too.


    Start by observing your bird — the times of day he/she most likely to relieve himself/herself and the body language he/she uses just before, such as tail wagging or stepping back. Pick your desired command — “Go potty” or “Hurry up” will do, as will anything, just as long as you’re consistent.


    When you see your bird getting ready to go or you know it’s the usual time he/she does (such as first thing in the morning), ask him/her onto your hand (or finger, if he/she is a small bird) and hold him/her over a wastebasket, newspaper, toilet, or other “poop zone”. Give your potty command and praise him/her when he/she obeys — even though the response is just a coincidence at first, of course. Praise and stroking are the rewards for correct behavior.

    * Moustaki, N. (2005). Parrots for dummies. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Pub.

    • When to Clip Your Parrot's Wing Feathers...

    When you first get your parrot, you need to clip his/her wings for their safety and your good relationship. You’ll develop the closest relationship with your bird if he/she is easy for you to control and if they needs you. With clipped wings, your bird needs your help to get off the floor and up to safer heights. He/she also needs you to go from room to room. When he/she needs to go somewhere, you’re the one who can get him/her there. He/she just has to figure out how to ask. That fosters trust and communication, especially when both of you are successfully getting your points across.


    We trim your parrot's nails and wings prior to him/her going to its forever home. Each one of our babies is allowed to fledge naturally and fly repeatedly prior to receiving their first wing trimming. If a customer prefers to not have their birds wings trimmed, they must let us know at the time of leaving a non-refundable deposit.

    Moustaki, N. (2005). Parrots for dummies. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Pub.

    • Items to Keep Your Parrot Away From... 

    Your parrot is a curious bird, but too much curiosity about the wrong things can be harmful to your feathered friends.

    The following list contains foods, household items, and other creatures to keep away from your parrot and your parrot away from:

    Moustaki, N. (2005). Parrots for dummies. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Pub.

    • Plants Poisonous to Your Bird (Below):

    Moustaki, N. (2005). Parrots for dummies. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Pub.

    • Substances Harmful to Your Bird (Below):
    Many of the cosmetics and cleaning products you use without thinking can be very harmful to your bird. Being small creatures, birds are sensitive to even minute toxins in the air, so never expose your pet to any of the following substances:

    Moustaki, N. (2005). Parrots for dummies. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Pub.

    • How to Teach a Child to Behave Around a New Parrot?

    Incorporating a parrot into your family takes some adjustment from everyone, especially children. The tips in the following list can help your child — and anyone who isn’t familiar with birds — adjust to the newest, most feathered member of the family:


    • Use inside voices, but don’t whisper.

    • Talk to your new parrot. Get it used to the sound of your voice.

    • Don’t play with the bird too much in the first few days. Allow the bird to become acclimated.

    • Move slowly. Children tend to display sharp, quick movements which can scare parrots.

    • Be gentle. Never squeeze, hit, or throw the bird. Use slow, gentle movements.

    • Be compassionate and understanding. Teach your child that the bird is not a toy.

    • Teach your child not to be afraid of the bird. Fear will lead to an ignored and unhappy companion.

    • Don’t stick your fingers in the cage or tease the bird.

    • If the bird is afraid, it’s not personal. He’s just being a bird.

    • Offer the bird yummy treats to make friends with it.

    Moustaki, N. (2005). Parrots for dummies. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Pub.

    • Signs of a Healthy Pet Bird...

    Too often, bird-owners fail to notice early clues of illness because their pets are particularly skilled at hiding these signs. You need to know what’s normal for your bird so that you can spot changes that mean illness — and call your veterinarian.


    A healthy bird:

    • Behaves normally, perching without problems, moving with coordination, using the full body without favoring one side or the other.

    • Bears weight evenly, all four toes present on each foot and in proper position.

    • Is alert and responsive.

    • Breathes easily, with no sign of laboring or tail-bobbing.

    • Has eyes, ears, and nostrils that are free of debris.

    • Has healthy plumage. 

    • Consistently produces droppings that are normal in appearance. 

    • Has well-muscled body.

    Moustaki, N. (2005). Parrots for dummies. Indianapolis, IN: Wiley Pub.